Governor Mandako Should Stop Abusing Rights Of Street Families




The main challenge facing governor Mandako is ignorance fueled by personal megalomania and tribal sentimentality. Especially, in regard with the manner in which he has handled the street families living in Uasin Gish County, mostly in Eldoret town. 


First I want to tell governor Mandako and his county government that they were wrong and in fact, therefore criminally liable for putting street children in a lorry only to forcefully move them out of Eldoret to Malaba Border town.

He did not confirm whether, those street families came from Malaba Border town or not. Also the raid for street children even affected people that were not street urchins.

If you could not speak Nandi language and you had a dirty garment you were violently thrown into a lorry and then taken to Malaba Border town regardless of your origin. This was brutal and pure impeachment to human rights by the government driven by tribal ideology.

Such acts of terror on the humble were perpetrated in the past by Id Amin Dada against Asians and the physically handicapped people in Uganda.

Hitler also did similar savage to some Jews that were in Germany during the Second World War. American government also forcefully took the Negroes to Sierra Leone and Liberia in a redeployment fueled by the racial hatred of blacks by white Americans.

Ngugi wa Thiongo in his book, Dreams in Time of War also narrates how the colonial leadership forcefully moved Kikuyu families from their homes and then caged them behind a barbed wire in the reserves. Currently, such acts are also observable in acts of Israeli terrorism on Arabs in Palestine.

Lessons from Such pockets of historical injustices need at least to inspire and light governance decisions before breaking into immensity of human rights violation like the one that have been graced and perpetrated by Governor Mandako in Eldoret town two days ago.

The tears of these people are wiped from their face by God, but they are not the last to cry; the rich also cry, if not by themselves then through their children and grand children.

Economically, the street families don’t affect the Uasin Gishu County budget in any manner whatsoever, socially, all urbanizations come along with street families, and even in London we have the gypsies. And legally the street families are Kenyans unless proved otherwise by the court of law but not debates in County assemblies. The street families have a constitutional right to live anywhere in Kenya.

They also have a constitutional right to be included in the share of the County budget allocations but not to be savagely excluded, they some leaderships like that of Mandako put blinkers on their eyes against the open sores in our societies. The street families need protection by the government at all levels. And as well be mobilized into social projects and community work as a political effort to rehabilitate them.

Street families in Eldoret are not illegal immigrants. They are children sired by local women fertilized by local men in Eldoret, Governor Mandako being one of them. Even if they don’t speak Nandi; they have Nandi blood running in their veins. This is a fact given the tribes of sex workers around Eldoret town.

Thus taking the street families of Eldoret town to other parts of the Country is a misplaced thinking. There is no reason in pampering the truncheon in your hand and you are hostile to human life. You will be surprised to meet these street children that you have brutalized in the future when you will have expired from politics.

Alexander Khamala Opicho,
Lodwar, Kenya

Source: Alexander Opicho
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